Skip to content

Alumna Profile: Elizabeth Hagler

by Kevin Webster

Elizabeth Hagler has a unique personal story that revolves around her lifelong passion: running. “Running provides a means for me to connect with the present moment. It gives me the sense that I can do anything, and it provides me with grit,” she said. Yet running is more than a hobby for her; it is the common thread that intersects her experience with the Haslam Scholars Program, service to her community, and the University of Tennessee at large. She, along with her best friend and Haslam Scholar peer Chelsea Knotts (2008 cohort), was a four-year member of UT’s track team. Continue reading

Unified Diversity

By Michaela Faunce

With our extensive work at Pond Gap and Inskip Elementary Schools as Haslam Scholars, we are often recognized for our service in those communities. Collectively, we serve in a Robotics Club, Lego League, a French Club, Science Saturday, two bicycle clubs, a cooking club and two cultural Saturday clubs. We work in classrooms, community gardens, and a circus club. However, we are equally passionate about our leadership development. We have served as class presidents, founders of high school clubs and church organizations, board members, and team captains. These roles have prepared us well for managing the responsibilities of being a Haslam Scholar. Continue reading

My Summer in Scotland

By Catherine Moore

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.”

I remember first seeing these wise words of Socrates when interviewing in March 2015 for a coveted spot in the Haslam Scholars Program. They hung on a wall in the conference room of the Honors & Scholars suite and delivered a silent message to the 30 students gathered at UT that weekend. Quite frankly, however, I recall being more focused on answering the interview question pertaining to poetry than I was on the quote. Fast forward to two and a half years later, I have passed the quote countless of times without ever giving it much thought—until now. Continue reading

Making Change with SGA

By Grey Mangan

Before I even set foot on campus, I knew I wanted to hit the ground running in college through both academics and extracurricular activities. My goal was to seek out where I belonged and determine where I could make the most difference at the University of Tennessee and in the Knoxville community at large. I wanted to make my time in college a time of growth by interacting with the variety of communities available to me. Continue reading

Launching Honors Leadership

By Wesley Smith

It is a sunny afternoon in April and I receive a phone call from an unknown number. I ignore it. At this point, my college choice is down to two and I am running out of time. I check the voicemail and the call is from Meghan Perez, a name I know only because of its appearance at the bottom of several emails I have received from the Honors Leadership Program at the University of Tennessee.

I call her back to tell her I have not made a decision, expecting to leave it at that. By the end of our conversation, however, I have decided I am going to be a Volunteer. We will save the content of that call for later, but for now let us skip ahead to a sizzling Saturday afternoon in late August. Continue reading

Challenges, Support, and Leadership

By Peter Cates

Upon being admitted to the Chancellor’s Honors Program, I was surrounded by hundreds of students with incredibly varied passions and interests. Many of them challenged my ideas and helped me uncover new doors for intellectual engagement. Since arriving on campus, I knew it was the right community for me. Like many things in life, CHP is very much so about what you put in, and so I have been as involved as possible. Continue reading

Researching Community Health in Kenya

By Colbe Boles

At the beginning of my sophomore year, I began thinking about what type of research I wanted to be involved in. There are lots of research opportunities across campus and while I considered which to invest in, I realized I wanted to do a specific type of research. Rather than sign up for the first research lab I found on campus, I chose to invest my time and energy into something that I was passionate about. Because of this decision, nine months later I found myself conducting research on the relationship between trust and physicians in rural Kenya. Continue reading

Opportunities, Not Requirements

By Jaime Marquis

“They’re opportunities, not requirements” At the time of honors orientation, I didn’t understand the mindset my parents were trying to relay to me. I mistakenly saw the Chancellor’s Honors Program requirements simply as another checklist I had to complete by the end of each semester, not as an opportunity for personal growth. That was before I knew the extent to which the CHP Ready for the World requirement would shape my college career into what it is today. Continue reading

The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System and partner in the Tennessee Transfer Pathway.

Report an accessibility barrier