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“On Life and Death”: CHP Becker Lunch with Sheldon Solomon, October 26

On October 26, we are excited to welcome Dr. Sheldon Solomon, psychologist and Professor at Skidmore College. From Skidmore’s website: “His studies of the effects of the uniquely human awareness of death on behavior have been supported by the National Science Foundation and Ernest Becker Foundation, and were featured in the award winning documentary film Flight from Death: The Quest for Immortality. He is co-author of In the Wake of 9/11: The Psychology of Terror and The Worm at the Core: On the Role of Death in Life. Sheldon is an American Psychological Society Fellow, and a recipient of an American Psychological Association Presidential Citation (2007), a Lifetime Career Award by the International Society for Self and Identity (2009), and the Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs Annual Faculty Award (2011).”

Dr. Solomon has partnered with our own Dr. Hulsey on a summer study abroad at Oxford University for many years and will be speaking with us ‘the role of death in life.’

Interested students should read the following two articles in preparation for the discussion.

Solomon Article 1

Solomon Article 2

Lunch will be provided at this Becker Seminar which begins at 11:30 a.m. To register for this event, sign up below. Note that space is limited.

“For All the World to See” – Honors & Scholars Guided Tour Plus Lecture

Honors & Scholars is partnering with the McClung Museum to present a guided tour of the museum’s civil rights exhibit For All the World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights on October 18th at 5:00 p.m. This exclusive tour will be followed by a guest lecture by Dr. Herman Gray, a scholar of African-American popular culture.

To sign up, please submit the form below. Space is limited.

*1794 Scholars can use this event for Global and Cultural Awareness.

*For Chancellor’s Honors, this program counts as a Becker Seminar.

Sorry! We've reached capacity on this event! No more spots are available.

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