Skip to content

Message from the Associate Provost

Dr. Timothy Hulsey The office of Honors & Scholars programs serves more than 2,000 students across four distinctive programs. Our students hail from almost every academic major and come to us from across the U.S. and the world. Our programs are designed for students who strive to excel, not just in the classroom but also in life. Honors students at UT have more than high test scores and excellent GPAs. They are broadly curious, they become leaders on campus and in the community, they learn because they love to, and they push themselves in directions they might never have imagined. Ours is a place for students who strive to be the best they can be. To quote a colleague, our programs are “… one space on the campus where deep thought flourishes, and where ‘excellence’ still possesses meaning.”[1]

Our programs attract and serve the kinds of students who win places in prestigious medical, law, and graduate schools. They also win major national and international scholarships and fellowships, including the Rhodes, Truman, Goldwater, and Fulbright scholarships. They go into public service, start non-profits, join corporations, and even become world-class opera singers; in short, just about anything they want.

We offer tailored honors experiences via four specialized programs: the Haslam Scholars Program, the Chancellor’s Honors Program, the Honors Leadership Program, and the 1794 Scholars Program. Each of these programs is designed to provide students with the best possible honors experience. Each has been created for students with specific goals in mind, from the focused Honors Leadership Program to the more general Chancellor’s Honors Program. You will find detailed information about each program on our website.

We adopted an unofficial motto around here, “Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.”[2] If this sounds like a good way to approach your education, then you may be one of us. So, please, take your time, review our programs, call or email us with your questions, and let us help you find your place in our community of scholars.

Cordially,

Dr. Hulsey signature

Dr. Timothy Hulsey, Associate Provost


[1] West, Nancy M., What’s the point of an honors college anyway? The Chronicle of Higher Education, January 27, 2014.

[2] This is variously attributed to Socrates, Plutarch, and even Yeats. The best evidence is that is comes from Plutarch.

The flagship campus of the University of Tennessee System and partner in the Tennessee Transfer Pathway.

Report an accessibility barrier